CFIM Symposium – University of Copenhagen

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CFIM symposium 2014

To celebrate its 4th anniversary, CFIM is organizing a symposium. It will be held on the 12th of September, Hannover auditorium, the Panum Institute.

Congratulations to the winners of our 2014 micrograph contest!

Abigail Mackey, University of Copenhagen.
Stem cell (yellow) undergoing mitosis in situ on a human muscle fibre.

Matthias Mörgelin, University of Lund.
Pseudocoloured Staphylococcus aureus killed on biomaterial. Green: intact; Yellow: killed; Red: bacterial exudate.

Programme

10:00 Welcome address

10:15 Prof. Markus Sauer - Dpt for Biotechnology and Biophysics, University of Würzburg, Germany
Eight years of single-molecule localization

Markus Sauer is one of the inventors of dSTORM and he will present the work of his lab in >Super Resolution Microscope.

11:15 René Svensson -Institute of Sports Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital
Continuity of mature tendon collagen fibrils

11:30 Tau Benned-Jensen - The Ion Channel Group, BMI, KU
Live-imaging of Kv channels in neurons using phluorins

11:45 Vito Foderà - Dpt of Drug Design and Pharmacology, SUND, KU
Protein Amyloid-like Self-Assembly studied by TEM

12:00 Hinke Multhaupt - BMI @ BRIC, SUND, KU
Combining genetics with electron microscopy to investigate syndecan signalling

12:15 Lunch

13:15 Kaare Grunddal - Section for Metabolic Receptology and Enteroendocrinology, CBMR, University of Copenhagen
Characterization of the ultrastructure and peptide co-storage patterns in enteroendocrine cells

13:30 Abigail Mackey, BMI, SUND, KU and Institute of Sports Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital
The regeneration of human skeletal muscle from several points of view

13:45 Jens Midtgaard, Neuroscience and Pharmacology, KU
Structure and function of a CNS synapse

14:00 Claire Meehan, Neuroscience and Pharmacology, KU
Plasticity of the axon initial segment: Size is important!

14:15 Lasse Saaby, Dpt of Pharmacy, pharmaceutical design and drug delivery, KU

Characterization of lipid-based drug-delivery systems using cryogenic transmission electron microscopy